The mission of Great Falls College MSU is to educate and inspire you. Y ear O ne S elf -E valuation R eport Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities March 1, 2016 G reat F alls C ollege M ontana S tate U niversity Dr. Susan J. Wolff CEO/Dean  406.771.4305  susan.wolff@gfcmsu.edu   www.gfcmsu.edu  February 26, 2016 Dear Year One Accreditation Team Members, It is always a pleasure to welcome you to Great Falls College Montana State University (GFC MSU) whether it is a virtual or on-site visit. GFC MSU is a comprehensive two-year college within the Montana University System. The college is independently accredited and aligned with Montana State University in Bozeman within the structure of the university system. The college has evolved from its inception in 1969 as a vocational-technical center as part of the Great Falls Public School System, to a College of Technology governed by the university system and the State Board of Regents, and, since 2012, a comprehensive two-year college within the Montana University System. Through these changes the college has stayed true in providing post-secondary education to the residents of North Central Montana. In the year since our Year Seven visit and re-accreditation, the college has developed new mission and vision statements, and values; written a new tag line; revised its core themes, indicators, and college learning outcomes; and is in the midst of writing a new strategic plan. All of this work took place through a strong shared governance model including faculty, students, staff, administrators, and community partners at the same time the college undertook an academic and administrative prioritization process. The purpose for the prioritization is to focus existing resources on student success strategies and having the capability of being responsive to future community needs. We welcome your visit and look forward to learning from you. Sincerely, Dr. Susan J. Wolff, CEO/Dean   Table of Contents Institutional Overview ............................................................................................................... 1 Basic Institutional Data Form ................................................................................................... 3 Preface ......................................................................................................................................11 Mission, Core Themes, and Expectations .............................................................................. 23 Executive Summary of Eligibility Requirements 1-3 .................................................. 23 Standard 1.A Mission ................................................................................................... 24 Standard 1.B Core Themes .......................................................................................... 27 Conclusion ............................................................................................................................... 33 Appendix: Samples of Core Indicator Performance Reports .................................................. 35 The mission of Great Falls College MSU is to educate and inspire you. I nstitutional O verview Institutional Overview Great Falls College Montana State University (GFC MSU) is a public two-year college offering the comprehensive community college mission to the larger Great Falls area. The city of Great Falls, located in the northcentral part of the state, is Montana’s third most populous. It is the county seat of Cascade and has approximately 60,000 residents. More than 73% of the students in academic year 2014-2015 were residents of that county. Of the remainder, the largest numbers of enrollees were from neighboring Chouteau, Teton, Glacier, and Pondera Counties. GFC MSU offers online courses and programs, extending the reach of the college throughout Montana and nationwide. There is no public four-year higher education institution in Great Falls. The GFC MSU student population is 70% female. In fall 2014, 53% of the students attended part-time and 72% worked at least part-time. Thirty-three percent are first-generation college students and 47% are older than 25, with an average age of 27. In fall 2014, the college had a median class size of 17 and a student-to-faculty ratio of 18:1. Sixty-six percent of GFC MSU students attended class face-to-face, 4% in a hybrid format, and 30% completely online. The college was founded in 1969 as a vocational technical education center and initially operated as a unit of Great Falls Public School District (GFPS) to provide employment training to the community. Great Falls College MSU (then the Great Falls Vocational-Technical Education Center) earned initial accreditation in 1979 from (then) Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges. In 1987, the Montana Legislature delegated the general administration and supervisory control of Montana’s five vocational-technical education centers to the Montana Board of Regents of Higher Education. In 1994, as a result of Montana University System restructuring, the college became one of four campuses in the Montana State University family and was renamed Montana State University Great Falls College of Technology. In early 2013, all Montana two-year colleges of technology were renamed through College!Now, a university system two-year campus rebranding initiative, and the college became Great Falls College Montana State University. The campus includes two main buildings and an early childhood education center located on 36 acres. The 134,650 square-foot main building houses faculty and administrative offices; state of the art science and computer labs; regular and computer classrooms; the North American Network of Science Labs Online (NANSLO) node (one of only two in North America); facilities for the carpentry and industrial technology programs; centralized student support services in Student Central; the Advising and Career Center; the Weaver Library and eLearning Center; the Academic Success Center (ASC); an Academic Testing Center; a Native American Center; a staffed Veterans Success Center; a bookstore and café; the Adult Education Center (administered by the Great Falls Public School District); KGPR Public Radio; MSU-Northern Great Falls offices; and Lifelong Learning. A second building, the 12,392 square-foot Trades and Industries Building, houses the welding/fabrication facility and a welding test center. A third building is home to the Bright Beginnings Learning Center, a child development center providing daycare and early childhood education services for the children of students attending the college and others in the community. GFC MSU offers three transfer degrees: the Associate of Science, the Associate of Arts, and the Certificate of General Studies. In addition, the college provides 7 Certificates of Technical Studies (CTS, formerly called Professional Certificates); 11 options for the Certificate of Applied Science (CAS); and 21 Associates of Applied Science (AAS) designed specifically for entry into and advancement in a variety of career fields. The college offers more health science programs (23) than any other institution in Montana and is home to the most comprehensive simulated hospital in the state. The college will soon be Great Falls College Montana State University 1 adding an AAS in computer programming and a CTS in medical scribe. The health informatics and radiologic technology assistant programs recently were placed into moratorium. The college offers developmental education coursework to upgrade math, reading, and writing skills; schedules lifelong learning and community enrichment programming to teach new skills, support hobbies, or allow for career exploration; and provides customized and contracted workforce training to support the economic development of northcentral Montana. GFC MSU also is recognized as a trans-border welding testing facility, allowing Canadian and American welders to complete certification testing without traveling to Alberta. GFC MSU is an important employer in the Great Falls region. At this writing, the college employs 84 full-time administrative and support staff, 49 full-time faculty, 3 part-time faculty, and 74 adjunct faculty. Of these, more than 85% live in the service area. The college is itself a large-scale buyer of goods and services. According to an economic impact study by EMSI, in FY 2012-2013 the college spent $9.8 million on payroll and another $11.2 million on day-to-day operations. The net impact of this spending was approximately $13.7 million in added regional income. Thirty faculty and adjunct faculty members hold advanced credentials and certifications, including 16 who have doctorate degrees. More than 100 full- and part-time faculty and adjuncts hold Montana OPI Class 1, 2, 3, 4, or 8 licenses, allowing them to teach dual credit courses. That number is higher than on any other campus in Montana. As a result, the college has been able to develop and pilot innovative programs such as a dual credit welding cohort that allows high school students to complete the Certificate of Applied Science in Welding and Fabrication Technology during their senior year of high school. Many of the faculty engage in research activities and supervise important grants that support cutting-edge advancements in science and technical education. GFC MSU has expanded STEAM, creating new arts, humanities, advanced mathematics and science courses to support transfer in engineering, technology and the fine arts. This has allowed for the creation of new articulations such as a 1 + 3 transfer option to Montana State University in nine engineering fields. Since 2014, GFC MSU has been part of the Montana Space Grant Consortium (MSGC), a NASA-supported organization that supports STEM education in the state. During this time, the MSGC has awarded approximately $30,000 to GFC MSU students, faculty, and staff in the form of scholarships, research and supply grants, and more. The Great Falls College MSU Community Choir has been invited to perform at Carnegie Hall in New York City in May 2016. Great Falls College MSU is committed to fostering innovative, flexible learning opportunities for people of all ages, backgrounds, and aspirations, and to contributing to the stability and economic growth of the Great Falls community. The college efficiently provides programs and services for students with funding from state appropriations, federal grants, and student tuition and fees. Students at GFC MSU received more than 300 scholarships in 2014-15 totaling more than $465,000. Scholarships were received from institutional, local, state, and out-of-state resources. Great Falls College Montana State University 2 N ORTHWEST C OMMISSION O N C OLLEGES AND U NIVERSITIES B ASIC I NSTITUTIONAL D ATA F ORM Information and data provided in the institutional self-evaluation are usually for the academic and fiscal year preceding the year of the evaluation committee visit. The purpose of this form is to provide Commissioners and evaluators with current data for the year of the visit. After the self-evaluation report has been finalized, complete this form to ensure the information is current for the time of the evaluation committee visit. Please provide a completed copy of this form with each copy of the self-evaluation report sent to the Commission office and to each evaluator. To enable consistency of reporting, please refer to the glossary in the 2003 Accreditation Handbook for definitions of terms. Institution: Great Falls College Montana State University Address: 2100 16th Ave South City, State, ZIP: Great Falls MT 59405 Degree Levels Offered: Doctorate Masters Baccalaureate Associate Other If part of a multi-institution system, name of system: Montana State University Type of Institution: Native/Tribal Comprehensive Specialized Health-centered Religious-based Other (specify) Institutional control: Public Private/Independent ( Institutional calendar: City Non-profit Quarter County State Federal Tribal For Profit) Semester Trimester 4-1-4 Continuous Term Other (specify) Specialized/Programmatic accreditation: List program or school, degree level(s) and date of last accreditation by an agency recognized by the United States Department of Education. (Add additional pages if necessary.) Program or School Degree Level(s) Dental Assisting CAS Dental Hygiene Health Information Coding Specialist AAS CAS Great Falls College Montana State University Recognized Agency American Dental Association Council on Dental Education American Dental Association Council on Dental Education American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) Date Oct 2008 Sept 2011 Sept 2010 3 Health Information Technology AAS Medical Assisting AAS Paramedic AAS Physical Therapy Assistant Practical Nursing Registered Nursing AAS AAS ASN Respiratory Care AAS Surgical Technology AAS Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics & Information Management Education (CAHIIM) Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) in collaboration with the Committee on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CoEMSP) Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) Approved by Montana State Board of Nursing Approved by Montana State Board of Nursing Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC) Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) Oct. 1999 March 2012 Sept 2011 April 2009 Oct 2014 Oct 2014 May 2007 Nov. 2015 Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Enrollment (Formula used to compute FTE: Number of total credits divided by 15 (full time unit count)) Official Fall Classification Undergraduate Graduate Professional Unclassified Total all levels 2015 (most recent year) FTE Student Enrollments Current Year Dates: Fall 15 1085 1085 One Year Prior Dates: Fall 14 1176 1176 Two Years Prior Dates: Fall 13 1255 1255 Full-Time Unduplicated Headcount Enrollment. (Count students enrolled in credit courses only.) Official Fall Classification Undergraduate Graduate Professional Unclassified Total all levels 2015 (most recent year) Student Headcount Enrollments Current Year Dates: Fall 15 1658 1658 Great Falls College Montana State University One Year Prior Dates: Fall 14 1770 1770 Two Years Prior Dates: Fall 13 1873 1873 4 Numbers of Full-Time and Part-Time Instructional and Research Faculty & Staff and Numbers of Full-Time (only) Instructional and Research Faculty & Staff by Highest Degree Earned. Include only professional personnel who are primarily assigned to instruction or research. Total Number Number of Full Time (only) Faculty and Staff by Highest Degree Earned Rank Full Time Part Time Less than Associate Associate Bachelor Masters 49 74 1 5 9 28 Specialist Doctorate Professor Associate Professor Assistant Professor Instructor Lecturer and Teaching Assistant Research Staff and Research Assistant Undesignated Rank 6 Mean Salaries and Mean Years of Service of Full-Time Instructional and Research Faculty and Staff. Include only full-time personnel with professional status who are primarily assigned to instruction or research. Rank Mean Salary Instructor Mean Years of Service $50,378 8.6 Associate Professor Assistant Professor Instructor Lecturer and Teaching Assistant Research Staff and Research Assistant Undesignated Rank Financial Information. Complete each item in the report using zero where there is nothing to report. Enter figures to the nearest dollar. Auxiliary and service enterprises of the institution (housing, food service, book stores, athletics, etc.) should be included. The institution’s audit materials should be an excellent reference for completing the report. Fiscal year of the institution: Reporting of income: Reporting of expenses: July 1-June 30 Accrual Basis Accrual Basis Great Falls College Montana State University Accrual Basis Accrual Basis 5 B ALANCE S HEET D ATA ASSETS C URRENT F UNDS Unrestricted Cash Investments Accounts receivable gross Less allowance for bad debts Inventories Prepaid expenses and deferred charges Other Due from Total Unrestricted Restricted Cash Other Accounts Receivable Due from Total Restricted T OTAL C URRENT F UNDS E NDOWMENT AND S IMILAR F UNDS Cash Investments Other (identify) Due from T OTAL E NDOWMENT AND S IMILAR F UNDS P LANT F UND Unexpended Cash Investments Prepaid Exp & Deferred Charges Net A/R Total unexpended Investment in Plant Land Land improvements Buildings Equipment Library resources Other: Intangible Assets Total investments in plant Due from Other plant funds T OTAL P LANT F UNDS O THER A SSETS –A GENCY O THER ASSETS - DESIGNATED OTHER ASSETS - AUXILIARY OTHER ASSETS - R & R T OTAL O THER A SSETS T OTAL A SSETS Great Falls College Montana State University Last Completed FY Dates:06/30/2015 One Year Prior to Last Completed FY Dates:06/30/2014 Two Years Prior to Last Completed FY Dates:06/30/2013 537,101 0 276,373 102,571 0 24,497 562,954 348 1,503,844 706,782 0 209,750 56,904 0 356,510 0 0 1,329,747 928,321 0 227,583 (5,501) 0 214,804 0 0 1,365,208 60,332 0 484 139,064 252,757 1,756,600 75,385 0 1,433 113,463 190,281 1,520,028 113,365 0 43,082 42,237 198.684 1,563,892 11,300 0 0 0 11,300 0 0 0 11,300 0 0 0 11,300 11,300 11,300 0 715,147 0 11,500 204,679 931,326 0 1,080,461 0 0 1,533,489 0 11,117 1,091,579 477 1,533,966 363,993 280,164 19,115,980 1,352,969 155,518 13,470 21,282,092 363,993 78,301 19,438,167 1,169,284 183,138 34,936 21,267,819 363,993 90,665 19,447,436 841,931 217,847 59,395 21,021,267 0 22,213,418 326,919 2,337,342 1,243,758 48,546 3,956,564 47,937,771 0 22,359,398 234,419 2,439,874 1,151,102 58,506 3,883,901 50,850,119 0 22,555,233 234,404 2,376,657 1,071,588 58,423 3,741,073 51,154,265 6 B ALANCE S HEET D ATA (continued) L IABILITIES C URRENT F UNDS Unrestricted Accounts payable Accrued liabilities Students’ deposits Deferred Revenue Other: Securities Lending Liability Other: Compensated Absences Other: Property Held in Trust Other: LT OPEB Implicit Rate Subsidy Due to Fund balance Total Unrestricted Restricted Accounts payable Other: Deferred Revenue Accrued Liabilities Due to Fund balance Total Restricted T OTAL C URRENT F UNDS E NDOWMENT AND S IMILAR F UNDS Restricted Quasi-endowed Due to Fund balance T OTAL E NDOWMENT AND S IMILAR F UNDS P LANT F UND Unexpended Accounts payable Notes payable Bonds payable Accrued Liabilities Other Liabilities Other: Compensated Absences Other: Deferred Revenue Due to Fund balance Total unexpended Investment in Plant Notes payable Bonds payable Mortgage payable Other liabilities (identify) Due to Other plant fund liabilities (identify) T OTAL I NVESTMENTS IN P LANT F UND Great Falls College Montana State University Last Completed FY Dates:06/30/2015 One Year Prior to Last Completed FY Dates:06/30/2014 Two Years Prior to Last Completed FY Dates:06/30/2013 450,927 743,657 0 97,912 0 655,762 4,226 3,847,917 450,236 225,837 0 93,748 0 571,909 4,226 1,932,164 564,283 215,317 0 190,112 0 534,916 2,268 1,727,412 0 4,407,768 5,800,400 0 2,046,650 3,278,120 0 1,952,515 3,234,308 90,543 37 37,996 7,926 91,140 348,355 6,148,755 33,238 37 0 1,958 92,766 97,515 3,375,634 9,196 123 4,579 3,157 134,173 64,511 3,298,819 0 0 0 11,300 0 0 0 0 11,300 0 0 0 0 11,300 0 0 20,780 0 0 1,615 1,051 171 121,982 0 685,565 145,599 0 3,576 0 0 0 1,092 326 61,002 0 1,025,583 65,995 0 4,938 0 0 0 1,576 1,034 69,240 0 1,457,179 76,787 0 0 0 0 524,046 0 524,046 0 0 0 0 573,604 0 573,604 0 0 0 0 620,161 0 620,161 7 O THER L IABILITIES : A GENCY OTHER LIABILITIES : DESIGNATED OTHER LIABILITIES : AUXILIARY T OTAL O THER L IABILITIES T OTAL L IABILITIES F UND B ALANCE 326,919 498,144 294,533 1,119,595 7,937,995 20,758,046 234,419 333,103 116,377 683,900 4,699,133 20,694,216 234,404 252,130 106,486 593,021 4,588,789 20,401,106 C URRENT F UNDS , R EVENUES , E XPENDITURES , AND O THER C HANGES R EVENUES Tuition and fees Federal appropriations State appropriations Local appropriations Grants and contracts Endowment income Auxiliary enterprises Other E XPENDITURE & M ANDATORY T RANSFERS Educational and General Instruction Research Public services Academic support Student services Institutional support Operation and maintenance of plant Scholarships and fellowships Other Plant & Depreciation/Amort Mandatory transfers for: Principal and interest Renewal and replacements Loan fund matching grants Other (identify) Total Educational and General Auxiliary Enterprises Expenditures Mandatory transfers for: Principal and interest Renewals and replacements Total Auxiliary Enterprises T OTAL E XPENDITURE & M ANDATORY T RANSFERS O THER T RANSFERS AND A DDITIONS /D ELETIONS (identify) E XCESS [deficiency of revenues over expenditures and mandatory transfers (net change in fund balances)] Great Falls College Montana State University 3,484,223 4,113,761 7,369,367 0 3,664,254 0 1,438,266 585,135 One Year Prior to Last Completed FY Dates:06/30/14 5,766,216 4,331,612 6,941,133 0 1,659,670 0 1,916,585 966,189 9,283,262 0 276,384 1,293,234 1,591,792 1,900,502 872,298 2,777,593 1,706,495 8,030,260 0 70,869 1,389,049 1,399,095 1,414,439 1,019,853 5,124,578 1,569,111 6,978,495 0 72,794 1,319,543 1,303,049 1,481,300 929,754 3,205,730 1,284,315 0 0 0 51,973 19,753,532 0 0 0 0 0 0 20,017,253 16,574,980 1,685,046 1,855,005 1,794,418 0 0 1,685,046 21,438,578 0 0 1,855,005 21,872,258 0 0 1,794,418 18,369,398 (720,489) (207,275) 48,495 Last Completed FY Dates:06/30/15 Two Years Prior to Last Completed FY Dates:06/30/13 4,172,280 4,529,601 6,124,436 0 990,386 0 1,528,215 971,409 8 I NSTITUTIONAL I NDEBTEDNESS T OTAL D EBT TO O UTSIDE P ARTIES Last Completed FY Dates: One Year Prior to Last Completed FY Dates: Two Years Prior to Last Completed FY Dates: F OR C APITAL O UTLAY F OR O PERATIONS Domestic Off-Campus Degree Programs and Academic Credit Sites: Report information for off-campus sites within the United States where degree programs and academic coursework is offered. (Add additional pages if necessary.) Degree Programs – list the names of degree programs that can be completed at the site. Academic Credit Courses – report the total number of academic credit courses offered at the site. Student Headcount – report the total number (unduplicated headcount) of students currently enrolled in programs at the site. Faculty Headcount – report the total number (unduplicated headcount) of faculty (full-time and part-time) teaching at the site. P ROGRAMS AND A CADEMIC C REDIT O FFERED AT O FF -C AMPUS S ITES W ITHIN THE U NITED S TATES Location of Site Name City, State, ZIP Degree Programs Academic Credit Courses Student Headcount Faculty Headcount Programs and Academic Courses Offered at Sites Outside the United States. Report information for sites outside the United States where degree programs and academic credit courses are offered, including study abroad programs and educational operations on military bases. (Add additional pages if necessary.) Degree Programs – list the names of degree programs that can be completed at the site. Academic Credit Courses – report the total number of academic credit courses offered at the site. Student Headcount – report the total number (unduplicated headcount) of students currently enrolled in programs at the site. Faculty Headcount – report the total number (unduplicated headcount) of faculty (full-time and part-time) teaching at the site. Great Falls College Montana State University 9 P ROGRAMS AND A CADEMIC C REDIT C OURSES OFFERED AT S ITES OUTSIDE THE U NITED S TATES Location of Site Name City, State, ZIP Degree Programs Great Falls College Montana State University Academic Credit Courses Student Headcount Faculty Headcount 10 The mission of Great Falls College MSU is to educate and inspire you. P reface Preface Update on institutional changes since the March 2015 Year Seven Self-Evaluation Report The last report from the college, the Year Seven Self-Evaluation Report, was submitted in March 2015. Keeping with the mission of a two-year college to be flexible, nimble, and relevant to best serve its students and community, the college has made several changes since the last report. Those changes are the following: Students come first In a campus-wide campaign to encourage everyone to keep students at the forefront of everything, the campus adopted the theme “It Takes All of Us.” Dr. Susan J. Wolff, CEO/dean, challenged faculty and staff with the question “What did you do today to help a student come back tomorrow?” Faculty and staff are encouraged to submit stories of anything they did to help a student – helping someone find a classroom, offering encouragement about assignments or tests, congratulating success or listening to a student’s troubles. In January, faculty and staff signed cards of goals they would strive to do in the coming semester to “help a student come back tomorrow.” What have you done today to help a student return tomorrow? From adjunct faculty member: I had one student who had decided that she did not want to complete the EMT program because she felt overwhelmed after the first day of class. She came to my office on Tuesday to speak with me about it. I related a story about a young student who was pretty nervous, and after the first day, he wanted to withdraw from the EMT program. He spoke with me and I convinced him to give it the first week to try to let things settle. Well, after that first week, he came back to class. He was hooked on learning more about emergency services. He struggled and pushed through, he completed the course and obtained his EMT license. This student was awarded the EMT of the Year for 2015 from Great Falls Emergency Services, and I could not be more proud. As I related this story to her, I could tell that she could begin to identify with the student. She was still nervous, but she came to class on day two. Today is day three, I spoke with her after class yesterday and I expect to see her again today during class. Revised Mission, Vision, Values, Core Themes, Objective and Core Indicators Preparing the Year Seven Report was an ideal time to assess the relevancy of the college’s previous mission, vision, values, core themes, objectives and indicators. Based on that work and the development of a new seven year strategic plan, college faculty, students, staff, and administrators revised the mission, vision, values, core themes, objectives and indicators which were reviewed by the CEO/Dean’s Executive Advisory Council. The mission and vision were approved by the Board of Regents of the Montana University System at their September 2015 meeting. The entire package will be presented to the Regents at their March 2016 meeting. College Planning, Budget and Analysis Committee The College Planning, Budget and Analysis Committee (CPBAC) continues to be a robust piece of Great Falls College MSU’s commitment to shared governance. The committee expanded its membership to include all members of the Joint Directors Committee. This expansion added four members: the RevUp Great Falls College Montana State University 11 fiscal manager, director of contract training, director of the Academic Success Center, and director of Lifelong Learning. CPBAC created four standing task forces, in line with GFC MSU’s core themes of Workforce Development, Transfer Preparations, Academic Preparation, and Community Development. These committees will develop annual strategic plans and report progress semi-annually to the larger CPBAC group. Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM) This formal committee was organized in 2013-14 to look at enrollment data and develop strategies to help manage enrollment. After studying data, the committee selects a number of initiatives for the coming year and presents those to CPBAC for consideration. In 2015-16 CPBAC chose two: improving the front-end experience for students (making sure students have realistic expectations, helping students be ready for college, helping them be prepared) and increasing online course and program offerings. What have you done today to help a student return tomorrow? From faculty member: I tried to foster a positive relationship with an at-risk student. His comments today made me smile inside. Program changes • • • • • • A request was submitted to the Board of Regents in November 2015 to offer an Associate of Applied Science in computer programming beginning fall 2016. The Sustainable Energy Technician program underwent a change to better meet the demands of local industry. The program will be offered in fall 2016 as an Industrial Technician CAS program, with options to obtain an AAS as either an Industrial Technician or Renewable Energy Technician. A Medical Scribe Certificate of Technical Studies is awaiting approval from NWCCU and then the Department of Education. The first cohort of the Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associates of Science in Nursing (ASN) began classes in January 2016. The Radiologic Technology program graduated its final cohort of students May 2015. The program is in moratorium. Great Falls College MSU opened its newly expanded welding and fabrication facility in September 2015. The expansion increased the number of welding booths from 15 to 34 and increased the capacity from 60 to 102 students. The expansion was funded by a $1.2 million grant from the Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Authority and a portion of a $25 million grant from the Department of Labor’s TAACCCT III program. RevUp grant funds also purchased a mobile welding lab for use in off-site welding instruction and testing. What have you done today to help a student return tomorrow? Faculty member on first day of class: “I emphasize that I am here to help them succeed and that I am available when they want to meet with me or have problems that I may be able to help them with.” Great Falls College Montana State University 12 Changes in department structure Beginning fall 2015, the Trades Division became a stand-alone division. The programs in the Trades Division include carpentry, welding and fabrication, and sustainable energy technician (transitioning in fall 2016 to industrial technician). • • • • • In September 2015, the General Education and Transfer Division was renamed the General Education, Business, Technology and Transfer Division to better describe the expanded areas now included in the division. Beginning fall 2015, the biology department became part of the Health Sciences Division. It was previously part of General Education and Transfer. The change will better facilitate the alignment of course objectives with health science program outcomes. The North American Network of Science Labs Online (NANSLO) also moved into the Health Sciences Division in the restructure. In July 2015, the Workforce Development Division began operating as a stand-alone division with an emphasis on customized training, adding specialized training courses and increased focus on development stackable welding and fabrication credentials under the RevUp Montana project. The division also has supported the RevUp and EDA welding expansion projects by working to develop a welding and fabrication testing and training facility in the expanded welding and fabrication shop areas and a mobile welding and fabrication training and testing unit. The Outreach program changed its name to Lifelong Learning to better reflect what it does. It is expanding its course offerings and will be piloting some for-credit courses, of which it currently offers very few. Lifelong Learning has created an advisory board and is working to become self- sustaining in the next five years. The Native American Enrichment Center was incorporated into the Academic Success Center to better serve American Indian students and to promote cultural awareness among the campus community. The Issksiniip Grant Project, which funded the center, ended on September 30, 2015. Issksiniip was designed to increase the diversity of healthcare workers (particularly American Indians) and to assist low income students with educational expenses. The Issksiniip project coordinator position ended as well on September 30, 2015. The director of academic success center took over management of the center. Issksiniip Scholarship Winners Total Completed Transferred/Drop Employed Healthcare BCC 117 31 28 55 38 U of M 74 26 24 30 21 GFC MSU 69 26 21 47 26 MSU Billings 21 9 9 13 9 Salish Kootenai 15 0 1 11 9 MSU Bozeman 11 0 2 3 3 Total: 306 92 85 159 106 Great Falls College Montana State University 13 Changes in management and staffing • • • • • • • • • • • The Trades Division hired two new welding and fabrication faculty and one shop aide to meet the needs of the expanded welding program. A new director of Lifelong Learning began working in September 2015. The two high school career coach positions were consolidated into one college pathways advisor. This position is now overseen by the director of admissions instead of the registrar. The college pathways advisor spends two days a week in each of the two local high schools and one day at GFC MSU. The student activities coordinator is now primarily funded through a student fee making this a permanent position. GFC MSU decreased the number of advisors from five to four in the Advising and Career Center. Two additional full-time nursing faculty were hired for fall 2015 to develop and deliver the ASN curriculum. Four new nursing clinical adjuncts joined the team in January 2016. The dental hygiene faculty team underwent a complete transformation during the past year. During fall 2015, the college hired a new dental hygiene program director, two new full-time faculty, a new dental clinic front desk coordinator, and two new dental hygiene clinical adjuncts. Dr. Donald Blevins remains as the supervising dentist. Program directors and faculty are now overseeing the simulation hospital, rather than the half- time coordinator who previously had those duties. The program director for the Health Information Technology program resigned effective December 15, 2015. An interim program director has been appointed until a search can be conducted. The web master was moved from Information Technology into the Communications and Marketing Department. A new marketing specialist position was created to oversee the college’s social media presence and assist with internal and external communications. What have you done today to help a student return tomorrow? From staff member: Yesterday I saw a lost student in the hallway and asked her if I could help her. She couldn’t find her classroom so I walked her to the room and visited with her all the way down there. This morning she found me and asked me to help her find her Tuesday classes. Glad she feels comfortable! Brief description of other institutional changes: • • • • • • The Academic Success Center expanded into an adjacent classroom in order to offer a separate area for math tutoring and quiet study area. The center’s hours were also increased in response to student requests, and online options were added so distance students can receive tutoring. New students now participate in an online orientation, rather than the previous face-to-face model, and advising is now done individually instead of group advising. GFC MSU began waiving the graduation fee starting summer 2015. GFC MSU convened a working group to discuss ways to enhance student retention, maximize student learning, advance institutional assessment, accountability and quality, and build a campus community by bridging the historical gap that can exist between academic affairs and student affairs. GFC MSU convened an Electronic Information and Technology working group led by the director of Disability Services to address campus-wide accessibility. All new and new transfer students are now required to take the AlcoholEdu and Haven Sexual Assault prevention and education modules if they have not completed previously before enrolling Great Falls College Montana State University 14 • • • • for the next term. These programs were selected by the Commissioner of Higher Education for the Montana University System to be offered at each institution as a step toward increasing safety for all students. GFC MSU created a new marketing plan for summer semester targeting continuing students and transfer students who might be home for the summer, or able to take an online class at the college. The college built its summer schedule by December 1 instead of March 1 so students and prospective students can see what courses will be offered and plan accordingly. The following programs submitted self-studies for continuing professional accreditation during 2015: Dental Assisting, Paramedic, Respiratory Care, Health Information Technology, and Health Information Coding Specialist. Two programs hosted accreditation site visits during fall semester 2015: The Dental Assisting program was visited in September, and the Paramedic team hosted a visit in November. The Veterans Success Center will remain open and staffed for three more years thanks to an $80,000 donation from a local business after one-time-only funding from the state Legislature expired. Great Falls College MSU has one of the highest populations of veteran and veteran dependent students amongst colleges and universities in Montana. The Veterans Success Center usage has grown from 19 veterans using the center 180 times in spring semester 2014 to 98 veterans using the center 1,568 times in spring semester 2015. The retention rate of student veterans using the center is 95%, while only 68% of veterans not using the center were retained. Fall 14 - Spring 15 Retention New & Transfer Students 95.0% 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 73.5% 70.0% 67.9% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% 1st - 2nd Semester Campus-Wide • Veterans who did not Visit Center Veteran Visitors to Center HealthCARE Montana Grant: In October 2014, a consortium of two-year colleges in Montana was awarded a $15 million TAACCCT grant from the Department of Labor to create statewide healthcare pathways and accelerated nursing pathways, and to provide services to students, such as accelerated credential completion, coaching and access to distance education. GFC MSU’s participation in this project allowed the college to hire a nursing faculty and a healthcare transformation specialist. Nursing faculty and directors have participated in statewide efforts that Great Falls College Montana State University 15 • have resulted in revamped nursing curricula for practical nursing and registered nursing (ASN). The group also is developing an ASN to bachelor’s degree completion pathway. And, finally, project staff and faculty have been participating in statewide efforts to develop an Allied Health common core curriculum. If approved, the new ASN program is expected to be launched in fall 2016; the new LPN program is expected to have a spring 2017 start date (students will begin pre- requisites in fall 2016.) RevUp Grant program: GFC MSU, as the lead college in this 13-member consortium of two-year colleges in Montana, continues its work on the RevUp project funded in October 2013 by a $25 million grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s TAACCCT program. The project has resulted in revamping of the college’s welding program into stackable credentials, intensive individual coaching for students, course sharing among collaborating campuses, and development of a fabrication program at GFC MSU. The project also included hiring a workforce navigator at each college to recruit students, do case management and build industry relationships. In response to an internal survey, navigators were asked how many students had enrolled that without the navigators’ off-site personal contact likely would not have done so. The average response was five. Based on that, project staff calculated that with tuition and FTE valuation, the impact of those additional students was $124,000 for the college. The stackable credentials offer students multiple places to earn a credential, especially useful for those who cannot continue to obtain a certificate of applied science or associate of applied science. A graphic showing the potential power of awarding these credentials is included on the following page. The chart after that shows the results of the intensive individual coaching by InsideTrack. Great Falls College Montana State University 16 RevUp CTS Offerings TAACCCT Requirements: • Colleges must develop stackable certificates as part of their latticed programs. Recommendations from RTI Interim Report 7.31.15 • Offer one-semester Certificates of Technical Studies (CTS) as an off-ramp opportunity for students • Acknowledges a student’s accomplishments • Creates a smooth path to reentry into a the program at the same or another institution if she or he cannot continue As part of the RevUp Montana initiative, InsideTrack has offered Success Coaching to Great Falls College students beginning in Fall 2014. Over 1400 students, at five Consortium schools, have received InsideTrack Coaching since the partnership began. By December 2016, over 2000 students will have received coaching. Results pictured here represent a snapshot of the ongoing partnership. Final results will be presented with the conclusion of the initial partnership term in early 2017. Fall 2014-to-Fall 2015 retention analysis reveals higher retention rates among those receiving coaching when compared to overall school ’ s retention over the same time period. Early Results Demonstrate Efficacy of Coaching Coached-group retention compared to actual campus retention 69.8% 63.3% 55.2% 50.3% CITY COLLEGE 59.2% 49.7% 46.1% FVCC 64.3% GFC MSU MSUN InsideTrack Notes: Cohorts based on registration as of census in a student’s first term in school. School data received from Erik Rose and Maya Tsidulko in Oct 2015. Results are based on registration status as of census in each subsequent term. Continuing students excluded. N’s (InsideTrack Coached/School Total) = City College: 87/308; FVCC: 30/471; GFC MSU: 103/364; MSUN: 63/336. Great Falls College Montana State University 18 Prioritization The top priority of Great Falls College MSU is student success. As a part of this mission, the college strives to offer the most applicable academic programs so students succeed in their educational goals. In addition, the college endeavors to offer the most efficient and effective student support programs, which encompass everything from academic advising to facility maintenance. Over the past few years, the college has experienced a continued decrease in student enrollment, primarily due to the strong economy experienced in Montana. A strong economy, with low unemployment rates, is quite positive for the community; however, it presents potential students with many options that do not depend upon educational attainment. As a proactive response, Great Falls College MSU began a prioritization process in August 2015 to evaluate all its academic and administrative programs. This process was conducted by two separate volunteer task forces. Faculty evaluated academic programs, and classified and professional staff evaluated administrative programs. No Executive Team members served on either task force. Prioritization is designed to target resources for reallocation for future uses. The targeted financial goal of prioritization was set at a minimum of $250,000. Each task force used pre-set criteria for their evaluations. These criteria were based on Robert Dickeson’s Prioritizing Academic Programs and Services 1 and modified by a team of GFC MSU staff and faculty who had earlier attended an orientation by Dickeson on the process. From these evaluations, programs were placed into five quintiles. Following two campus-wide meetings to reveal the quintiles, they were given to the CEO/dean for final decisions on sustaining, reorganizing, enhancing, or eliminating programs. The CEO/dean also used current and projected economic and workforce studies, state office data and initiative plans, and community partner input in her decision-making. Decisions were announced February 2016. 1 Dickeson, Robert C. (2010). Prioritizing academic programs and services: Reallocating resources and achieving strategic balance. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Great Falls College Montana State University 19 Response to Topics Previously Requested by the Commission Recommendation 1 The evaluation committee recommends that the College review the formative measures it uses to assess core themes, strategic priorities, Common Ground, and the Eight Abilities and develop a summative assessment framework that could be effectively used as evidence to assess mission fulfillment (Standards 1.B, 2.C.1, 4.A, and 5.A). Response Beginning in January 2015, the college began working to formulate new college mission, vision and values statements and corresponding core themes and indicators, an effort led initially by the chief information officer and later by the chief financial officer. Leadership held numerous campus-wide open sessions, asking participants to brainstorm ideas and statements. Those ideas that appeared repeatedly were drafted into several potential mission and vision statements and presented to the College Planning, Budget and Analysis Committee (CPBAC), Faculty Senate and Executive Team. Once the mission and vision were set by CPBAC and the Executive Team, core themes were drafted and again approved by CPBAC, Faculty Senate and Executive Team. A permanent task force was assigned to each core theme. These task forces were charged with drafting the core indicators, with assistance from the institutional researcher. The resulting indicators have been approved by CPBAC, Faculty Senate and the Executive Team. The core theme task forces also are charged with setting annual and seven-year targets for each indicator. Based on these targets, CPBAC will establish a seven-year strategic plan and annual operating plan for accomplishing these targets. The target date for completing the seven-year strategic plan is June 2016. The core theme task forces will report to full CPBAC semi-annually on the core indicators. The strategic plan will be adjusted if CPBAC considers a mid-year adjustment necessary. Otherwise, CPBAC will look at the target and the progress made during the year. The progress will help CPBAC determine whether it is fulfilling its mission or whether new targets and plans need to be made. The Eight Abilities have been reworked into five College Learning Outcomes by the College Learning Outcomes Assessment Team (CLOAT), as outlined in the response to Recommendation 2. This team is working to develop assessment of those learning outcomes. Because of the complexity of measuring college-wide learning outcomes, this process has – for the present – been separated from the strategic planning process. Once the assessment has been finalized, the intention is that setting College Learning Outcomes targets and planning to achieve those targets will be enfolded into the strategic plan. Great Falls College Montana State University 20 Recommendation 2 The evaluation committee recommends that the College rewrite the Eight Abilities in assessable language, and then specifically assess them using both direct and indirect measure of student learning. Moreover, the results of those assessments should be used to demonstrate continuous improvement (Standards 2.C.1, 4.A.4, and 4.B.2). Response The College Learning Outcomes Assessment Team (CLOAT) was formed in November 2015 and is made up of five faculty members, one member from the Academic Advising Center, the institutional researcher and the chief academic officer. The group is charged with developing and implementing the assessment of student learning at GFC MSU. The team has begun work to create learning assessment materials and reports that directly assess course, program, degree and institutional student learning outcomes. Great Falls College MSU has adopted five College Learning Outcomes that will replace the previous Eight Abilities. The plan is to align these five College Learning Outcomes with program outcomes and place this alignment in the fall 2016 syllabi across the campus. The five outcomes include: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Effective Communication Technical Literacy Engaged Citizenship Workmanship Critical Thinking In the remaining 2015-16 academic year, CLOAT plans to: • • • • • • Create criteria (in assessable language) for measuring the outcomes. Request program directors to align their program outcomes to the five learning outcomes. Request program directors to modify all fall 2016 syllabi to include the five outcomes. Request all instructors to continue to utilize the Course Objectives Assessment forms (known campus-wide as the Phase Four forms) to assess course objectives. Provide guidance to instructors to assure that direct tools and perhaps indirect tools are utilized for assessing course objectives. Initiate the steps for the development of a central repository for those forms. Additionally, CLOAT will create an annual report that will be posted on the college website based on data from the forms and indirect tools of assessment. These annual reports will be reviewed by CLOAT to assure the measurement of student learning and continuous improvement. The Five College Learning Outcomes will be implemented in fall 2016. CLOAT will be a standing committee and will meet on an ongoing basis. Recommendation 3 The evaluation committee recommends that the College develop and implement a regular evaluation process to assess the effectiveness of its academic advising program (Standards 2.C.1, 4.A.4, and 4.B.2). Response Great Falls College MSU is developing a regular evaluation process to assess the effectiveness of its academic advising. The Advising and Career Center will pilot an advising evaluation survey in the spring 2016 semester. The survey will be administered through Survey Gizmo through D2L Brightspace. Students will be notified of the survey through their advising shells in D2L Brightspace as well as during their meetings with advisors. All students will also be notified of the survey through a campus wide email. The evaluation survey will be based on National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) best practices. Great Falls College Montana State University 21 Upon completion and compilation, the director of Academic and Career Advising, with assistance from the institutional researcher/research analyst, will review and analyze the results of the surveys. The director of Academic and Career Advising will share the results of the pilot survey with academic advisors, the CEO/Dean’s Executive Team, and Joint Directors. After this review, a plan of action will be developed with the assistance of advisors, the Executive Team, and CPBAC to determine what changes or improvements can be made to academic advising and the evaluation process. This plan of action will include a plan to administer future academic evaluation surveys at least on a yearly basis. Great Falls College Montana State University 22 The mission of Great Falls College MSU is to educate and inspire you. M ission , C ore T hemes , and E xpectations Mission, Core Themes, and Expectations Executive Summary of Eligibility Requirements 1-3 Eligibility Requirement 1. Operational Status The institution has completed at least one year of its principal educational programs and is operational with students actively pursuing its degree programs at the time of the Commission accepting an institution’s Application for Consideration for Eligibility. The institution has graduated at least one class in its principal educational program(s) before the Commission’s evaluation for initial accreditation. Great Falls College (GFC MSU) has been accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) since 1979. Eligibility Requirement 2. Authority The institution is authorized to operate and award degrees as a higher education institution by the appropriate governmental organization, agency, or governing board as required by the jurisdiction in which it operates. Great Falls College MSU is authorized to deliver certificates and degrees by the Montana Board of Regents of Higher Education, the state’s public higher education governing board. Eligibility Requirement 3. Mission and Core Themes The institution’s mission and core themes are clearly defined and adopted by its governing board(s) consistent with its legal authorization, and are appropriate to a degree-granting institution of higher education. The institution’s purpose is to serve the educational interest of its students and its principal programs lead to recognized degrees. The institution devotes all, or substantially all, of its resources to support its educational mission and core themes. Great Falls College MSU’s mission and core themes epitomize the mission of the comprehensive community college and were adopted by the Montana Board of Regents, the college’s governing board, in September 2015. As a comprehensive two year college, GFC MSU’s primary purpose is to serve the students and community through a focus on teaching and learning and to award students with recognized post-secondary credentials aligned with their educational goals. The college allocates all of its resources to this end. Great Falls College Montana State University 23 What have you done today to help a student return tomorrow? Staff member: Over the past several days I have provided orientation to numerous new students in the library, bookstore, Academic Success Center, and not only do I try put a friendly, accessible face to their time here, I also make a point to inquire about each student’s program of study and offer encouragement and understanding towards the stress they often feel at the start of a semester. Standard 1.A: Mission 1.A.1 The institution has a widely published mission statement ‒ approved by its governing board ‒ that articulates a purpose appropriate for an institution of higher learning, gives direction for its efforts and derives from, and is generally understood by, its community. The mission of Great Falls College MSU, approved by the Montana Board of Regents at its September 2015 meeting is: To educate and inspire you. The college communicates its mission through the tagline, Where it all begins! Aligning with the Montana University System Strategic Plan and the Comprehensive Two-Year Education Mission and Vision, Great Falls College MSU fulfills its mission by: • • • • Providing health sciences, trades, business and computer degrees and certificates that lead to meaningful employment; and providing customized and post-employment training for regional employers; Providing the Montana University System core and transfer degrees that allow for seamless transfer into educational programs at other institutions. Providing developmental education and cooperating with Adult Education to prepare students for college-level studies; Providing community enrichment courses to individuals seeking to improve their skills and knowledge and to enrich their lives; providing a vibrant community gathering space for cultural events, celebrations, meetings, debates and presentations. Vision The vision of GFC MSU is to strengthen communities through excellence, innovation, and collaboration. Values The campus community identified a set of values that describe and define the qualities the college deems essential and create a sense of distinctiveness. • • • • • GFC MSU values Accountability – The college ensures decisions are data-informed and grounded in the best interest of students and their communities. GFC MSU values Integrity – The college values civic responsibility, high academic standards, ethical practices, trust and the courage to act. GFC MSU values Positivity – The college teaches and leads from a lens of potential, collaboration and results. GFC MSU values Respect – The college values differences and treats others with civility, encouraging open and honest communication. GFC MSU values Responsiveness – The college recognizes and acts upon opportunities to be innovative, flexible, and adaptable to student and community needs. Great Falls College Montana State University 24 • GFC MSU values Transparency – The college is committed to participatory governance and has created an environment where academic, financial and administrative functions are conducted openly. The process by which the college crafted its mission, values, core themes and objectives shows its commitment to shared governance. Beginning in January 2015, the college began working to formulate new college mission, vision and values statements and corresponding core themes and indicators, led by the chief information officer and later by the chief financial officer. Leadership held numerous campus-wide open sessions, asking participants to brainstorm ideas and statements. Those ideas that appeared repeatedly were drafted into several potential mission and vision statements and presented to the College Planning, Budget and Analysis Committee (CPBAC), Faculty Senate and Executive Team. Once the mission and vision were set by CPBAC, Faculty Senate and the Executive Team, core themes were drafted and again approved by CPBAC, Faculty Senate and Executive Team. A permanent task force was assigned to each core theme. These task forces were charged with drafting the core indicators, with assistance from the institutional researcher. The resulting indicators have been approved by CPBAC, Faculty Senate and the Executive Team. The core theme task forces also are charged with setting annual and seven-year targets for each indicator. Based on these targets, CPBAC will establish a plan for accomplishing these targets. Based on these targets, CPBAC will establish a seven-year strategic plan and annual operating plan for accomplishing these targets. The target date for completing the seven-year strategic plan is June 2016. The process of looking at data and progress on achieving the targets will help CPBAC determine whether it is fulfilling its mission or whether new targets and plans need to be made. 1.A.2 The institution defines mission fulfillment in the context of its purpose, characteristics, and expectations. Guided by that definition, it articulates institutional accomplishments or outcomes that represent an acceptable threshold or extent of mission fulfillment. What have you done today to help a student return tomorrow? Faculty member: I helped a student who wanted to drop out of all his/her classes earlier in the semester. I contacted the student’s adviser immediately and worked with the adviser and the student. I emailed the student to have a face to face meeting and offered the student extra time outside of class to perfect the skills the student was struggling with. The student did not drop out and is continuing to do great work. The keystone of the GFC MSU mission is the people the college educates and inspires – students and community members. The purpose of the mission is to guide initiatives and ongoing work to ensure the college remains focused on educating and inspiring individuals. The characteristics of the mission are that GFC MSU maintains open enrollment and meets students “where they are” to ensure they can pursue education and enrichment despite barriers that might otherwise prevent their success. By allowing its mission to guide its actions, GFC MSU has an expectation of student and community success as measured by the indicator targets set and monitored by the core theme task forces, CPBAC and the Executive Team. The Montana University System further has targets on which to based performance-based funding, many of which dovetail with the core indicators, although on an institution-wide basis. Great Falls College Montana State University 25 The college’s mission statement and accompanying components emerge from the commonly understood educational philosophy of the comprehensive two-year college in the state of Montana. Fundamentally, this means the college focuses on serving community needs, employing an open-admissions policy to engage individuals from all walks of life, and delivering academic programming in a variety of fields and modalities to help students succeed. Within this construct, the college’s mission is further delineated through the identification of four core themes and objectives: 1. Workforce Development: Prepare students to meet current and emerging workforce needs. 2. Transfer Preparation: Prepare students to transfer to an institution of higher education. 3. Academic Preparation: Prepare students for success in developmental education and college- level courses. 4. Community Development: Cultivate productive relationships through Lifelong Learning and community engagement. Therefore, the college defines the fulfillment of its mission to educate and inspire as the functional deployment of the comprehensive two-year college philosophy and the achievement of the objectives tied to the four core themes. The two-year college philosophy is embodied in the institution’s values, policies, and role within Montana’s system of higher education. The core themes, objectives and indicators of achievement are designed to measure institutional effectiveness and mission fulfillment. Articulation of an Acceptable Threshold, Extent, or Degree of Mission Fulfillment To articulate an acceptable threshold, or degree of mission fulfillment, the college has adopted a culture of data-driven, continuous quality improvement. As a performance-based institution, the college has created and is committed to an integrated, mission-centric model of assessment, planning and resource allocation at all levels of operation. This commitment is reflected through activities and processes emanating from the college’s mission, vision, values, core themes, and the system-level and campus strategic plans. The college uses an Institutional Performance Report using data to measure and evaluate mission attainment. CPBAC uses core indicator data to determine whether it is fulfilling the mission. Each core theme has a standing task force with the charge of recommending seven-year and annual goals and reporting progress to CPBAC. If a target is not met, the appropriate task force and ultimately CPBAC and the Executive Teamwill determine whether the target needs to be adjusted based on updated data or if other action is needed to reach that target. These reports take several formats, based on the target audience. Samples of two of these reports are included in the Appendix. Because the core indicators have recently changed, data for these sample reports are not available as of the writing of this report. However, baseline data will be reported to the core theme task forces to assist them in setting targets. Great Falls College Montana State University 26 What have you done today to help a student return tomorrow? Staff member: I assisted several students with finding their classrooms yesterday, in addition to putting them in contact with Julie Freshly for their insurance. I also worked with Division Directors to get the appropriate paperwork signed and submitted so instructors could begin teaching. It was a great first day and the students were very appreciative of the assistance as for some, it was their first day of college. Standard 1.B: Core Themes 1.B.1 The institution identifies core themes that individually manifest essential elements of its mission and collectively encompass its mission. The college meets its mission through core themes and objectives, which are measured by core indicators. Core Theme 1: Workforce Development Description: Prepare students to meet current and emerging workforce needs. Objective 1.1: Students enroll in workforce programs. Core Indicator 1.1: Workforce Program Enrollment Rationale: Participation in applied programs prepares students for entry into gainful employment or advancement in their current occupational areas. Measuring enrollment can help demonstrate whether individuals are finding the programs relevant in their career pathways. Measurements: Unduplicated headcount and full-time equivalent (FTE) of students enrolled in workforce degree programs. Excludes general education and associate degree students. Objective 1.2: Students are retained and graduated with the necessary skills and competencies for employment. Core Indicator 1.2.1: Workforce Program Retention Rationale: The longer students persist in applied programs indicates their increasing acquisition of the necessary2 skills and competencies for entry into gainful employment or advancement in their current occupational areas. Measurement: The proportion of degree-seeking students who began their enrollment at the college in workforce degree programs at the beginning of fall or summer term and who (1) were still enrolled for at least one credit as of census date in the fall of the next academic year, and (2) had not yet completed a degree or certificate. Those who have completed a degree are included in both the numerator and denominator when calculating persistence. Great Falls College Montana State University 27 Core Indicator 1.2.2: Workforce Program Degrees and Graduates Rationale: The credentials awarded after the completion of applied programs indicate that students have acquired the necessary skills and competencies for entry into gainful employment or advancement in their current occupational areas. Measurement: The number of workforce degrees, certificates or other college credentials granted annually by Great Falls College MSU. Measurement: Unduplicated number of graduates who earn a workforce degree, certificate or other college credential within an academic year. Core Indicator 1.2.3: Graduate Employment Rationale: The degree to which students are employed during the year following their graduation is a good indicator of whether students are graduated with the necessary skills and competencies for employment. Measurement: The proportion of the graduates from workforce programs who are employed all four quarters of the year following their graduation. Data are obtained from the Montana Department of Labor and Industry. Data do not include graduates who are self-employed or who are employed out of state. Objective 1.3: Provide specialized instruction in response to industry needs. Core Indicator 1.3.1: Customized Training Enrollment Rationale: The number of enrollments in customized training indicates the number of current employees who are seeking training and to what degree they are advancing their skills in response to current industry needs. This is an indicator of how the college is fulfilling its mission to educate community members. Measurement: Total enrollments (duplicated headcount) in specialized instruction during the academic year. Core Indicator 1.3.2: Customized Training Demand Rationale: The number of companies whose employees are receiving specialized instruction indicates the degree to which specialized instruction is responding to current industry needs. Measurement: Number of companies who contracted for specialized training for their employees during the academic year. Great Falls College Montana State University 28 Core Theme 2: Transfer Preparation Description: Prepare students to transfer to an institution of higher education. Objective 2.1: Students enroll in and complete transfer programs. Core Indicator 2.1.1: Transfer Enrollment Rationale: Participation in the transfer program indicates the college is fulfilling its two- year mission to prepare students for entry into higher level coursework at a four-year institution. Measurements: 1) Headcount and 2) FTE of students enrolled in General Education. Core Indicator 2.1.2: Transfer Retention Rationale: The longer students persist in General Education programs indicates their increasing acquisition of the necessary skills and competencies for entry into higher-level coursework at a four-year institution. Measurement: The proportion of degree-seeking students who began their enrollment at the college in the general education program at the beginning of summer or fall term and who (1) were still enrolled for at least one credit as of census date in the fall of the next academic year, and (2) had not yet completed a degree or certificate. Those who have completed a degree are included in both the numerator and denominator when calculating persistence. Core Indicator 2.1.3: Number of Transfer Graduates Rationale: The credentials awarded after the completion of general education programming indicate that students have acquired the necessary skills and competencies for entry into higher-level coursework at a four-year institution. Measurement: The number of transfer degrees, certificates or other general education credentials granted annually by Great Falls College MSU. Measurement: Unduplicated number of graduates who earn an associates transfer degree, general education certificate or other general education credential within the current academic year. Objective 2.2: Students transfer to an institution of higher education Core Indicator 2.2.1: Student Transfer Rationale: As part of its mission to educate and inspire, the college strives to encourage students to pursue higher education. The extent to which students are gaining some college education and then pursuing additional education indicates GFC MSU is fulfilling its educational mission. Measurement: Percentage of all students (including dual enrollment) transferring to an institution of higher education. Great Falls College Montana State University 29 Core Theme 3: Academic Preparation Description: Prepare students for success in college-level courses. Objective 3.1: Students succeed in developmental math and writing Core Indicator 3.1: Success in Developmental Coursework Rationale: Measuring success in developmental coursework demonstrates the college is fulfilling its educational mission by promoting subsequent success in college-level coursework and, in turn, college completion. Measurements: Pass rates in developmental math; pass rates in first subsequent college-level math course Pass developmental math: The proportion of students enrolled in developmental math coursework in fall term who earned a grade of C- or better in the developmental math course(s) they complete. Pass rates in first subsequent college-level math course: The proportion of students who successfully complete the highest level developmental math course, enroll in related college level (100 level or above) math course, and then earn a grade of C- or better in that college level math course. Pass rates in developmental writing; pass rates first subsequent college-level writing course Pass developmental writing: The proportion of students enrolled in developmental writing coursework in fall term who earned a grade of C- or better in the developmental writing course(s) they complete Pass rates in first subsequent college-level writing course: The proportion of students who successfully complete the highest level developmental writing course, enroll in related college level (100 level or above) writing course, and then earn a grade of C- or better in that college level writing course. Core Theme 4: Community Development Description: Cultivate productive relationships through Lifelong Learning and community engagement. Objective 4.1: Engage community through enrollment in Lifelong Learning courses. Core Indicator 4.1: Enrollment Rationale: The number of enrollments in Lifelong Learning indicates how many current community members are engaged and to what degree they are enriching their lives. This measure uses duplicate headcount because the ability to encourage individuals to return is considered a measure of the value of the courses. Measurement: Total enrollments (duplicated headcount) in Lifelong Learning courses during the academic year. Objective 4.2: Build strong relationships through fundraising efforts. Great Falls College Montana State University 30 Core Indicator 4.2: Resources Donated to College Rationale: The degree to which industry and community organizations invest in Great Falls College MSU, indicates the degree to which the college is central to the community’s interests. Measurement: Monetary value of donations acquired to benefit GFC MSU during the academic year, counted once in the year initially awarded to the college. What have you done today to help a student return tomorrow: Student: It is instructors like yourself that make a huge difference in students’ lives … Great Falls College Montana State University 31 Great Falls College Montana State University 32 The mission of Great Falls College MSU is to educate and inspire you. C onclusion Conclusion Throughout this report, there have been quotes from our “It Takes All of Us” webpage. These are excerpts of stories highlighting what people on campus are doing to help a student come back tomorrow. While these stories are wonderful, what is truly amazing is the work the faculty and staff are doing every single day to help a student come back tomorrow and to make the college mission a reality. Great Falls College MSU believes that its new mission statement – To Educate and Inspire You – reflects its focus on students. The mission statement contains an underlying power and depth of purpose yet is concise –easily remembered and used in conversations, in presentations and in written communications. The mission also reflects the college’s belief that education and inspiration drive its vision to strengthen communities through excellence, innovation, and collaboration. The values guide the paths the college will take and determine how the college will act in its everyday and longer term strategies to achieve its mission and vision. All were carefully crafted in keeping with the college’s overriding dedication to its students. In order to fulfill that mission, the college adopted four core themes: Workforce Development, Transfer Preparation, Academic Preparation and Community Development. These define general areas in which the college will work to fulfill its mission. Objectives provide specifics of what the college is trying to achieve in those four areas. All of the above were developed through an open process that included campus-wide brainstorming sessions, as well as work sessions with specific campus bodies whose voices were critical in drafting these documents – the College Planning, Budget and Analysis Committee (a body that includes representatives of all campus divisions), the Faculty Senate and the Executive Team. Core indicators are how the college will measure its progress. Each core theme has objectives and core indicators directly related to measuring progress in achieving those objectives. The annual and seven-year targets set by the Core Theme task forces and CPBAC will guide CPBAC and the Executive Team in setting strategies and allocating resources to meet those targets. The task forces will report to CPBAC semi-annually. Annual performance reports will allow CPBAC, Faculty Senate and the Executive Team to judge how well the college is fulfilling its mission. Great Falls College Montana State University 33 Great Falls College Montana State University 34 Appendix: Samples of Core Indicator Performance Reports Great Falls College Montana State University 35 Great Falls College MSU Performance Report - 2015/2016 Workforce Development (Core Theme 1) AY 14/15 % Change CI Workforce Program Enrollment (Unduplicated Headcount) Workforce Program Enrollment (FTE) Workforce Program Retention Workforce Program Degrees/Certificates Workforce Program Graduates (Unduplicated Headcount) Graduate Employment Customized Training Enrollment (Duplicated Headcount) Customized Training Demand 1.1 1.1 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.2 1.2.3 1.3.1 1.3.2 Transfer Enrollment (Unduplicated Headcount) Transfer Enrollment (FTE) Transfer Retention Number of Transfer Degrees/Certificates Number of Transfer Graduates (Unduplicated Headcount) Student Transfer 2.1.1 2.1.1 2.1.2 2.1.3 2.1.3 2.2.1 Transfer Preparation (Core Theme 2) Academic Preparation (Core Theme 3) Success in Developmental Coursework - Dev Math Success in Developmental Coursework - Subsequent Math Success in Developmental Coursework-Dev Writing Success in Developmental Coursework - Subsequent Writing 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 Enrollment (Duplicated Headcount) Resources Donated to College 4.1 4.2 Community Development (Core Theme 4) Overall Performance Great Falls College MSU FY16 1 CI: 1.1 Workforce Program Enrollment (Headcount) 1 CI: 1.1 Workforce Program Enrollment (FTE) 1 CI: 1.2.1 Workforce Program Retention 1 CI: 1.2.2 Workforce Degrees/Certificates 1 CI: 1.2.2 Workforce Program Graduates (Unduplicated Headcount) 1 CI: 1.2.3 Graduate Employment 1 1 CI: 1.3.1 Customized Training Enrollment (Duplicated Headcount) CI: 1.3.2 Customized Training Demand 2 CI: 2.1.1 Transfer Enrollment (Unduplicated Headcount) 2 CI: 2.1.1 Transfer Enrollment (FTE) 2 CI: 2.1.2 Transfer Retention 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 CI: 2.1.3 Number of Transfer Degrees/Certificates CI:2.1.3 Number of Transfer Graduates (Unduplicated Headcount) CI 2.2.1: Student Transfer CI 3.1 Success in Developmental Coursework - Dev Math CI: 3.1 Success in Developmental Coursework - Subsequent Math CI: 3.1 Success in Developmental Coursework - Dev Writing CI: 3.1 Success in Developmental Coursework - Subsequent Writing 4 CI: 4.1 Lifelong Learning Enrollment (Duplicated Headcount) 4 CI: 4.2 Resources Donated to College ha ng e en tC Pe rc 16 AY 15 AY 14 AY Co re Th Co em e re In (s) di ca to rs Performance Report